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The Phils get swept as they lose once again to the Brewers, 6-2.

Marlon ByrdThe Phils are swept by Milwaukee in their opening series at home, as they lose to the Brew Crew, 6-2.

The Phils took the lead in the bottom of the second as, with one man out, Marlon Byrd hits a solo home run, giving the Phils a 1-0 lead. The Brewers would tie the game up at one-all in the top of the fourth as, with one man on, and with nobody out, Aramis Ramirez hits an RBI double, knocking in Ryan Braun, who had started the inning off with a single. Two batters later, after Ramirez has moved up to third base on Jonathan Lucroy’s ground out, 4-3, for the inning’s first out, the Brewers would take the lead as Khris Davis hits an RBI single, scoring Ramirez, giving the Brewers a 2-1 lead. The Brewers increased their lead in the top of the sixth as, with a man on second, and with two men out, Davis hits an RBI double, knocking in Lucroy, who had just doubled, making it a 3-1 Brewers’ lead. The Phils would get a run back in their half of the sixth as, with the bases loaded, via a walk to Jimmy Rollins, a single by Chase Utley, sending Rollins up to third base, and a walk to Ryan Howard, moving Utley up to second base, and with two men out, Byrd hits an RBI infield single, knocking in Rollins, as Utley would reach third base, and Howard would stop at second base, making it a 3-2 Brewers’ lead. But the Phils threat would then end as Brewers’ starter Marco Estrado would get Dom Brown to fly out to center for the inning’s final out. The Brewers would get the run back in the top of the seventh as, with two men on, and with nobody out, Carlos Gomez hits an RBI single, knocking in Rickie Weeks, who had started the inning off with a walk, then stopped at second base on pitch-hitter Logan Schafer’s sacrifice bunt, making it a 4-2 Brewers’ lead, while sending Schafer, who had been safe at first on his bunt attempt, over to third base. The Brewers then took a 5-2 lead as Joe Segura hits an RBI single, knocking in Schafer, while sending Gomez over to third base. The Brewers then made it a 6-2 lead as Braun hits a sacrifice fly, scoring Gomez. That would end up being the final score as Francisco Rodriguez pitched a 1-2-3 ninth, striking out Cody Asche, swinging, to end the game.

Cliff Lee (2-1, 5.50) took the lost as he pitched six innings, giving up three runs on eight hits, while he struck out eight. Jeff Manship pitched to three batters, getting none of them out, as he gave up three runs on two hits. Jake Diekman pitched an inning, giving up a hit, while striking out one. Justin De Fratus pitched two scoreless innings, giving up a walk. Marco Estrado (1-0, 2.31) got the win as he went six innings, giving up two runs on five hits and two walks, while striking out six. Tyler Thornburg, Will Smith and Francisco Rodriguez would combine for three scoreless innings, giving up a hit (Smith) and a walk (Smith) between them, while striking out six (two batters apiece).

The Phils had only six hits in the game, with Chase Utley (Single) and Marlon Byrd (Single, Home Runs, 2 RBIs) both leading the team with two hits each. Jimmy Rollins (Single) and Carlos Ruiz (Single), had the other two Phils hits. The Phils also had three walks in the game (Rollins, Ryan Howard (2)), while Rollins was caught stealing second base, while the defense committed an error (Cody Asche) and an outfield assist (Dom Brown), while performing a doubleplay and a pickoff (Jake Diekman).

The Phils (3-6, 5th) will start a three-game series with the Marlins (5-5, 3rd), starting with a game tonight. The game will be played at Citizens Bank Park, and is to start at 7:05 pm EDT. The Phils will send to the mound A.J. Burnett (0-1, 3.66), who is coming off a lost against the Cubs on April 6, as he went five and two-thirds innings, giving up eight runs, four of which are earned, on five hits and six walks, while striking out three, in the Phils’ 8-3 lost. He will be trying to recover from his previous start. The Marlins will counter with Jose Fernandez (2-0, 0.71), who is coming off a win against the Padres on April 5, as he threw six and two-thirds innings, giving up three hits and two walks, while striking out eight, in the Marlins’ 5-0 win. He’ll be trying for his third win of the season. The Phils will be trying to put a stop to their four-game losing streak, while trying to get all parts of their game to work together.

The Phils’ bullpen allow in five runs in the last two innings, as the Phils end up losing again to the Brewers, 9-4.

Domonic BrownThe Phils drop their third straight game as the bullpen allow five runs to score in the last two innings, as the Phils lose to the Brewers, 9-4.

The Brewers took the lead in the top of the first as, with two men on, and with one man out, Aramis Ramirez hits an RBI single, knocking in Jean Segura, who had earlier singled, then stole second base, giving the Brewers a 1-0 lead, while sending Ryan Braun, who had just walked, up to second base. The Brewers then took a 2-0 lead one batter later as, with two men on, and with still one man out, Braun would score on shortstop Jimmy Rollins’ fielding error of Jonathan Lucroy’s grounder, allowing Lucroy to reach base, while Ramirez would stop at second base. The Phils got a run back in their half of the first as, with runners on second and third, and with one man out, Rollins, who was safe at first on a force out, 1-5, as Ben Revere, who had started the inning off with a single, is tagged out at second base by shortstop Segura, after originally being called safe by the second base umpire as pitcher Matt Garza’s throw to second base took Segura off of the bag, as the play is overturned via instant replay as Brewers’ manager Ron Roenicke came out of the dugout to dispute the call, then stopped at third base on Carlos Ruiz’s double, goes home on a balk committed by Garza, while Ruiz, who had just doubled, would move up to third base on the balk. Two batters later, after Ryan Howard has walked, putting runners on the corners, with still one man out, the Phils will tied the game up at two-all as Ruiz scores on second baseman Scooter Gennett’s force attempt throwing error of Marlon Byrd’s grounder, allowing Howard to be safe at second base, before going on to third base, and Byrd to go on to second base. The Phils then took the lead as Don Brown hits an RBI ground out, 4-3, scoring Howard, giving the Phils a 3-2 lead, while sending Byrd on to third base. The Brewers would retie the game at three-all in the top of the second as, with a runner on second, and with two men out, Segura hits an RBI double, knocking in Carlos Gomez, who had just doubled. The Brewers would retake the lead in the top of the fourth as, with two men out, Gomez hits a solo home run, his third home run of the season, giving the Brewers a 4-3 lead. The Phils would retie the game at four-all in the bottom of the fifth as, with a runner on third, and with one man out, Byrd hits an RBI single, knocking in Ruiz, who had started the inning off with a double, his second of the game, then moved up to third on Garza’s wild pitch. The Brewers would retake the lead for good in the top of the eighth as, with a runner on third, and with one man out, Mark Reynolds, who had started the inning off with a walk, stole second base, then moved up to third on Gennett’s sacrifice bunt, 2-4, would score on Howard’s fielding error of Logan Schafer’s grounder, giving the Brewers a 5-4 lead, while Schafer, who had reached base on Howard’s error, would continue to second base. Three batters later, the Brewers would take a 7-4 lead as, with two men on, as Segura is hit by the pitch, and with two men out, Braun hits a two-run double, knocking in both Schafer and Segura. The Brewers then made it a 9-4 lead in the top of the ninth as, with one man on, and with one man out, Reynolds hits a two-run home run, his second home run of the season, knocking in Lucroy, who had started the inning off with a single. That would end up being the final score as Jim Henderson pitched a scoreless ninth, getting Ruiz to strike out, swinging, to end the game.

Roberto Gonzalez received a no-decision as he pitched five innings, giving up four runs, only three of which were earned, on seven hits, a walk and two wild pitches, while he struck out nine. Jeff Manship and Jake Diekman combined for two scoreless innings, giving up two hits (one hit each) between them, while striking out four (Manship (1), Diekman (3)). Antonio Bastardo (0-1, 2.08) took the lost as he pitched an inning, giving up three runs, only one of which was earned, on a hit, a walk and a hit batter. Justin De Fratus pitched an inning, giving up two runs on two hits. Matt Garza also received a no-decision as he went six innings, giving up four runs, only three of which were earned, on eight hits, two walks, a balk and a wild pitch, while striking out four. Tyler Thornburg (2-0, 1.50) got the win as he threw two 1-2-3 innings, striking out two. Jim Henderson pitched a scoreless inning, as he gave up a hit and a walk, while striking out a batter.

The Phils had nine hits in the game, with Ben Revere (Singles) and Carlos Ruiz (Doubles) both leading the team with two hits. Marlon Byrd (Single, 2 RBIs), Dom Brown (Double, RBI), Jayson Nix (Single), pinch-hitter Tony Gwynn, Jr. (Single) and Cody Asche (Double), had the other five Phils’ hits, while the final Phil run came in on a balk. The Phils also had three walks (Revere, Jimmy Rollins, Ryan Howard) in the game, while the defense committed two errors (Rollins, Howard).

The Phils (3-5, T-4th East) will conclude their series with the Brewers (6-2, 1st Central) with a night game tonight. The game will be played at Citizens Bank Park and is to start at 7:05 pm EDT. The Phils will send to the mound Cliff Lee (2-0 , 6.00) who is coming off a win against the Cubs on April 5, as he threw seven shutout innings, as he gave up ten hits, while striking out six, in the Phils’ 2-0 win. He’ll be going for his third straight win, while trying to put a stop to the Phils’ present losing streak. The Brewers will counter with Marco Estrado (0-0, 1.59), who is coming off a no-decision against the Red Sox on April 4, as he pitched five and two-thirds innings, giving up two runs, one of which was earned, on three hits and three walks, while striking out six, in the Brewers’ 6-2 win. He will be trying for his first win, while trying to lead the Brew Crew to a series sweep. The Phils will be trying to end their losing streak.

Ryan Braun and the Brewers spoil the Phils’ home opener, as the Phils lose to the Brew Crew, 10-4.

jimmyrollinsThree home runs by Ryan Braun helps the Brew Crew ruin the Phils’ opening day at Citizens Bank Park, as the Phils lose to the Brewers, 10-4.

The Phils took the lead in the bottom of the first as, with two men on, and with two men out, Marlon Byrd hits an RBI infield single, knocking in Carlos Ruiz, who had earlier walked, then stopped at third base on Ryan Howard’s double, giving the Phils a 1-0 lead, while sending Howard, who had just doubled, up to third base. The Brewers would tie the game up at one-all in the top of the second as, with a runner on second, and with two men out, Mark Reynolds hits an RBI single, scoring Jonathan Lucroy, who had earlier doubled. The Brewers would take the lead in the top of third as, with two men on, and with nobody out, Ryan Braun hits a three-run home run, his first home run of the season, knocking in Carlos Gomez, who had started the inning off with a double, then moved up to third base on Jean Segura’s sacrifice bunt, and Segura, who would be safe at first on his bunt as pitcher Kyle Kendrick committed a fielding error trying to field the ball, giving the Brewers a 4-1 lead. The Brewers would add to their lead five batters later as, with two men on, and now with two men out, Scooter Gennett hits an RBI single, knocking in Lucroy, who had earlier walked, then stopped at second base on third baseman Cody Asche’s throwing error to first on Reynolds’ grounder, making it a 5-1 Brewers’ lead, while sending Reynolds, who was earlier safe on Asche’s error, over to third base. The Brewers then took a 6-1 lead as, with two men out, Braun hits a solo home run, his second home run of the season, and of the ball game. The Phils would get a run back in their half of the fourth as, with one man on, and with two men out, Jimmy Rollins hits an RBI double, knocking in Ben Revere, who had just singled, making it a 6-2 Brewers’ lead. The Phils then cut the Brewers’ lead down to 6-3 in the bottom of the fifth as, with two men on, and with two men out, Asche hits an RBI single, knocking in Dom Brown, who had earlier walked, then stopped at second base on Cesar Hernandez’s single, while sending Hernandez, who had just singled, up to third base. The Phils then made it a 6-4 Brewers’ lead in the bottom of the sixth as, with a man on third, and with nobody out, Rollins hits an RBI single, knocking in Revere, who had just tripled. The Brewers would get a run back in the top of the seventh as, with one man on, and with two men out, Khris Davis, who had just singled, would score on a fielding error committed by Revere on Reynolds’ fly ball, as he would be unable to catch the ball, making it a 7-4 Brewers’ lead, while Reynolds would stop at second base on the error. The Brewers then made it a 10-4 lead in the top of the eighth as, with two men on, and with one man out, Braun would hit his second three-run home run of the game, his third home run of the season, as he knocked in Gomez, who had earlier doubled and Segura, who had just been hit by the pitch. That would end up being the final score as Jim Henderson threw a 1-2-3 inning, striking out Ruiz on a foul tip, to end the game.

Kyle Kendrick (0-1, 3.75) took the lost as he pitched five innings, giving up six runs, only four of which were earned, on nine hits and two walks, while he struck out three. B.J. Rosenberg pitched one and two-thirds innings, giving up an unearned run on two hits. Mario Hollands pitched a third of an inning, getting out the only batter whom he would face. Brad Lincoln pitched two innings, giving up three runs on four hits and a hit batter, while striking out two. Kyle Lohse (1-1, 4.50) got the win as he pitched five innings, giving up three runs on seven hits and five walks, while striking out four. Zach Duke collected his second hold of the season as he pitched an inning, giving up a run on two hits, while striking out two. Will Smith also collected his second hold of the season as he pitched a scoreless inning, giving up a walk, while striking out a batter. Brandon Kintzler and Jim Henderson combined for two 1-2-3 innings, striking out three batters (Kintzler (1), Henderson (2)) between them.

The Phils had nine hits in the game, with Ben Revere (Single, Triple) and Jimmy Rollins (Single, Double, 2 RBIs) leading the ballclub with two hits each. Ryan Howard (Double), Marlon Byrd (Single, RBI), Dom Brown (Single), Cesar Hernandez (Single) and Cody Asche (Single, RBI), had the other five Phils’ hits. The Phils also had six walks (Rollins, Carlos Ruiz, Brown (2), Hernandez, Asche) in the game, while the defense would commit three errors (Kyle Kendrick, Asche, Revere), and throw out two runners (Kendrick/Ruiz. B.J. Rosenberg/Ruiz).

The Phils (3-4, T-4th East) will continue their series with the Brewers (5-2, T-1st Central) with a game tonight. The game will be played at Citizens Bank Park and is to start at 7:05 pm EDT. The Phils will send to the mound Roberto Hernandez (1-0, 3.38) who is coming off a win against the Cubs on April 4, as he pitched five and a third innings, giving up three runs on two hits and a walk, while striking out five, in the Phils’ 7-2 win. He’ll be trying to lead the Phils back to .500. The Brewers will counter with Matt Garza (0-1, 1,13), who is coming off a lost against the Braves on April 2, as he went eight innings, giving up a run on two hits and a walk, while striking out seven, in the Brewers’ 1-0 lost. He will be looking for his first win of the season. The Phils will be trying to get back to .500 while trying to even the series up at a game apiece.

2/19/2014 Ron Villone interview (Passed Ball Show)

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2/26/2014 Darryl Hamilton interview (Passed Ball Show)

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1/14/2014 Ron Clark interview (Passed Ball Show)

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12/30/2013 Bryce Florie interview (Passed Ball Show)

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2013′s MLB Bonehead of the Year, the 1st annual “NMA”

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There have been few MLB players who I have been more critical of than former Pirates, Nationals and Brewers OF Nyjer Morgan. And perhaps it is something I should back off soon. As it has been announced that Morgan will not return to the Japanese Yokohama team next season, there is a good chance he will land a job back in major league baseball as a 4th OF or even a platoon starting situation in the right spot. In that regard, I wish him the best. He is still a very serviceable player who put up decent to good numbers at Yokohama. I am presented my own award, which goes to the biggest bonehead of the MLB season, and I am calling it the “Nyjer Morgan Award”, presented by www.johnpielli.com.
I guess my disdain for @theRealTPlush comes from a series of incidents that happened within a little more than a year from each other. There was his barreling over of a defenseless catcher who was nowhere near the plate against the Marlins. While playing for the Nationals, his hit on Brett Hayes was uncalled for. What was worse was his reaction after being hit in retaliation for it, which escalated the situation. I am not saying he should have taken it, but to show up the team by stealing bases in a meaningless time of the game added to the fact that he was already wrong by hitting the catcher for no reason. If that was the one time he brought the negative vibes to himself, I could deal with it. Then there was him sticking his head into the Brewers/ Cardinals rivalry of 2011. His unprovoked shouting match with Cardinals RHP Chris Carpenter seemed like a cry for attention, and maybe an attempt to prove himself as a “Brewer”. With the fact that Carpenter has a reputation for antagonizing opposing players, that was another situation where if it was isolated, it would have been forgotten. Then there was the bold statements regarding the Cardinals playoff chances, which in itself simply made him look foolish. The Cardinals defeated the Brewers to win the NL Pennant and eventually the 2011 World Series. Add in the fact that he intentionally yelled “fuck yeah” knowing it was going to be heard on air on TBS, I have found it very difficult to endear myself to this man. Perhaps if he signed with my favorite baseball team, the New York Mets, I would give it one last chance.
But Nyjer Morgan is not the only associated with MLB that stands out as being a bonehead. 2013 was full of moments like that, from Mets SS Ruben Tejada’s overall cocky attitude almost costing him a job to some of the umpires either doing a terrible job at what they get paid to do or going on a world tour with the hopes that the general public knows their name. I came up with the five biggest boneheads in MLB for the 2013 season. But, before I get into them, here are some honorable mentions:
Brewers OF Carlos Gomez was clearly in the wrong when he took his grudge with Braves LHP Paul Maholm too far in a game in Milwaukee. Starting a fight with the entire Atlanta Braves team did not make Gomez look good, but to this point, this is the only time I have seen Carlos Gomez act that way.
Dodgers OF Yasiel Puig burst onto the scene and pretty much saved the Los Angeles Dodgers 2013 season. He did not do it without some questionable hick-ups though. The fact that he became enraged during an altercation with the Arizona Diamondbacks is justified as he was hit in the face. His lack of hustle and overstated bravado have made him as many enemies as fans.
Mets infielder Jordany Valdespin has hopefully learned his lesson after running himself off the New York Mets. He has not proven himself to be an MLB player, let alone one who can spout off at veteran teammates and then his manager after being sent down to AAA. Getting popped for a 50 game PED suspension did not help.
However, the Mets players and perhaps management decided to isolate Valdespin, which put them in the fire. They deserved some criticism for allowing Jordany to get hit by Pirates RHP Bryan Morris in a game after Valdespin admired a HR in a game that had been decided already. Valdespin should not have done what he did, but to let the Pirates discipline him made the Mets look small.
Marlins RHP Jose Fernandez showed up the Braves a little bit in a game this past season. I did not look at this as a serious bonehead move, but one that should be stated. Braves 3B Chris Johnson looked just as silly when he involved himself, then intentionally took a scared route around all the players. (It was clear he wanted to speak but wanted to nothing to do with backing up what he had to say.)
I am sure many others can be mentioned in regards to incidents that happened this season, so feel free to let me know. Before I get into my top five, I need to mention the consistent bad performance of umpire CB Bucknor, a man who I am sure tries very hard, but he is among the worst at what he does. Without further due, here are my top five boneheads of 2013 in MLB.
5. Carlos Quentin, OF, San Diego Padres: I would have ranked him a little higher as my initial reaction to his actions in the LA game had me more upset than I currently am. But, Carlos Quentin had no reason to rush the mound after he was hit by the Zack Greinke. While stating he was hit by Greinke twice before, he failed to acknowledge the fact that he stands closer to the plate than any other MLB hitter and is frequently among the most hit batters in all of MLB. If he has such a problem getting hit, maybe it is time to back off the plate.
4. Umpire Tom Hallion: Hallion has had enough of a reputation for being a hothead. Maybe he simply needs some anger management. However, his actions during a Rays game in Chicago simply make Hallion look silly. After what arguably seemed like a small strike zone by Rays LHP David Price, it seemed like Price composed himself professionally walking off the field after the 7th and final inning of his outing. Was he happy? No, but he did nothing to show up Hallion. Hallion took his mask and said, “Throw the fucking ball over the plate!”, enraging the Rays bench and leading to his subsequent ejection of Rays RHP Jeremy Hellickson. Hallion then called Price and the Rays bench a “liar” when asked about it after the game. My two cents: The Rays bench would not have reacted the way it did had Hallion not made that statement. Fans come out to see the players play baseball, not Tom Hallion.
3. Umpire Angel Hernandez: This will be my final time I cite a MLB umpire in this piece (#HoldUmpiresAccountable). Similar to Bucknor, there is no doubt that Angel Hernandez is one of the worst at doing his job. This was something known prior to his actions in a game between the Oakland Athletics and Cleveland Indians when he was named temporary crew chief when Gerry Davis was unable to participate in Oakland. A ball hit by Athletics infielder Adam Rosales was ruled a double on the field when there was uncertainty over whether it went over the HR line or not. The umpires went to watch the video replay of it, which should have shown inconclusively that the ball hit the railing above the yellow line over the fence in right center field. As the crew chief, Hernandez refused to overturn the improper call. After ejecting Athletics manager Bob Melvin, MLB determined that Hernandez made the incorrect call, even though instant replay was used.
2. Brian McCann, catcher, Atlanta Braves: I, personally, like the fact that Brian McCann defends his teammates and has the reputation for being a very good leader. That should translate well to his new team, the New York Yankees. And the two particular incidents were provoked by Jose Fernandez and Carlos Gomez, respectively. But, McCann does look like a bonehead after taking it upon himself to be the police on the diamond. Many players show up the opposition by admiring home runs, and in my opinion, Fernandez did nothing more than what guys like Yasiel Puig and David Ortiz do on a nightly basis. If the first instance does not happen, the second is not blown up as much as it was. I thought McCann overreacted with the Fernandez situation, though he was correct with the way he handled the Gomez one. And while I admire McCann for defending his teammates, there is no one MLB player in charge of morality.
1. Luis Cruz, 3B, team Mexico in WBC, Dodgers, Yankees: I find it amazing that the biggest bonehead in 2013 happened to be over an incident during MLB’s spring training. I figured somebody would have topped it during the long MLB season, and subsequent postseason. But Cruz, who currently is not playing for a MLB team and was let go twice during the season, still owns the prize. Not only did Cruz provoke a nasty brawl between team Mexico and team Canada, but the fact that he did not understand the rules of the tournament made him look even more foolish. After Canada OF Shane Robinson laid down a bunt to reach via a hit while Canada held a decisive lead, Cruz openly signaled to his pitcher to hit the next batter. The rules of the tournament stated that if teams finished with the same records, one of the ways of determining which team moved on was total runs scored. Cruz’ voice was heard, which led to three pitches being thrown inside to the next batter, the last which incited the aggressive brawl between the two teams. Cruz recently signed a contract with the Chiba Lotte Marines of the Japanese Professional League.
Perhaps I missed some other boneheads in MLB in 2013. Feel free to comment if there are any that strike your ire. Just remember, bitter feelings towards a manager for a team not doing well really dont count. Neither do underachieving players. Congratulations to Luis Cruz on winning the first annual “Nyjer Morgan Award”, presented by www.johnpielli.com.

12/17/2013 Gregg Zaun interview (Passed Ball Show)

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What it was that made the Seattle Pilots franchise so vulnerable

Going over the expansion draft of what would be the 1969 Seattle Pilots made me think about the franchise a little bit. How could a city that was given an expansion franchise lose that team after one season. The more I thought about it, the more I found some sense to the whole thing.
Expansion first hit baseball in the 1961 season. The Washington Senators, an original American League franchise, decided to move to Minnesota. While this was not the first time an MLB team changed locations, it was the first of its kind. Every other time a team relocated, it was at the expense of a team that had another baseball team in the same city of district. The Boston Braves moved to Milwaukee for the 1953 season, but Boston still had the Red Sox. The St Louis Browns moved to Baltimore for the 1954 season, but St Louis still had the Cardinals. The Philadelphia Athletics moved to Kansas City for the 1955 season, but Philadelphia still had the Phillies. As much as it was protested, the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants still moved to Los Angeles and San Francisco for the 1958 season. Because of all the New York bias, many refused to cope with the fact that New York still had the Yankees. So much, that the New York Mets were added to the National League for the 1962 season. But the move of Washington was the first of its kind.
The result of Washington’s franchise moving to Minnesota led to baseball’s first expansion. Washington, DC was left without a baseball team. That was the first time a MLB city was left without a team. MLB decided that Washington should have a team, which led to the re-addition of the Washington Senators to the AL for the 1961 season. Because scheduling conflicts would exist because one team is added, the AL added another team, the Los Angeles Angels. The decision of owner Charlie Finley to move the Kansas City Athletics to Oakland for the 1968 season bothered a lot of people, and left for Oakland for the 1968 season. The NL reacted to the unhappiness by granting the city of Kansas City an expansion franchise for the 1969 season.
So, if you have read to this point, you are probably saying, “I know about all that! What does all that have to do with Seattle losing its team after the 1969 season?” After a brief stay in Milwaukee, the Braves moved to Atlanta for the 1966 season. A similar outcry resulted in Milwaukee, but one that was for naught. Not only was Kansas City given a team for 1969, but cities that had never had an MLB team such as Seattle, San Diego and Montreal were given expansion teams. Why was Milwaukee not given an expansion team? Based on the history of the Senators and Athletics/ Royals, it was a fair question to be asked.
With new teams in San Diego and Montreal having long histories in the minor leagues, Seattle became vulnerable and a target of the baseball trust in the city of Milwaukee. Geographically, San Diego was a solid addition to baseball of the West Coast, joining LA and San Fran. There would have been some greater implications of trying to take the Expos out of Montreal. In the end, Milwaukee got a baseball team back, the Brewers from 1970 on. MLB did keep up with rewarding cities that lost teams by granting Seattle a franchise for the 1977 season. But, Washington did not have to wait at all to get a new team. Kansas City had to wait one full season. Milwaukee just four. Seattle had to wait a record seven seasons before they had a new team there. Of course, Washington now owns the record with a 33 year gap without having a baseball team. Montreal is entering its 10th season without a team in 2014. And from what has been heard, it seems unlikely there will ever be a professional baseball team in Montreal again. And that is sad.

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